History

This Curriculum Vision has been drafted in light of the new Ofsted Education Inspection Framework (EIF) and therefore is largely constructed around the newly identified foci of Intent, Implementation and Impact.

Nevertheless, a few points are worth making at the outset. It is the absolute belief of all members of staff in The Lakes School History Department that our subject is, perhaps, the most important of all, without which pupils can have no serious understanding of their place in their community, within their nation or on the international stage. It is therefore incumbent upon the History staff to ensure that our lessons are interesting, engaging and relevant and that they are delivered with passion and dedication so that all pupils willingly embrace the learning experience provided. We have a powerful responsibility as History teachers to help develop informed and active citizens and we take this responsibility most seriously.

In fact, so committed are we to the development and provision of a newly-robust and high-quality Key Stage 3 Curriculum, that we have taken the time and effort to completely overhaul our established provision not only in light of the new EIF but also with reference to the latest pedagogical research and advice from professional institutions such as The Historical Association. We have also taken care to ensure that it acts as both an introduction and a support to further, optional study at both Key Stages 4 and 5 and that the later GCSE and A-level topics on offer here at The Lakes School do not simply retread well-worn paths but instead complement and extend our pupils’ learning and understanding by broadening and deepening their studies in brand new areas.

In conclusion, it is hoped that the Curriculum laid out here will provide a pathway right across potentially seven years’ worth of historical study which the young people of The Lakes School will both enjoy and value and which is successful in helping them to grown into socially, politically and culturally aware young adults keen to contribute actively and effectively to the society in which they live.

History Department
The Lakes School
September 2019

Intent
Ofsted EIF: “leaders … construct a curriculum that is ambitious and designed to give all learners … the knowledge and cultural capital they need to succeed in life … (It) is coherently planned and sequenced towards cumulatively sufficient knowledge and skills for future learning and employment.”

The Lakes School History Curriculum (Years 7-13) meets these criteria in a number of ways. It sets out to make full use of the generous amount of teaching time the Department is granted at Key Stage 3 and in Years 8 and 9 specifically. It is intended to explore the political and social development of our kingdoms in some substantial depth and to tackle key concepts of particular relevance in our current climate. The development of our constitution and the gradual accretion of our rights over the centuries are two clear foci. Alongside these, Britain’s place on the international stage is explored repeatedly across all three years and the experiences of different parts of the world and the histories of different cultures are also promoted. At Key Stages 4 and 5, new and relevant topics are pursued where possible and any revisiting of prior topics is consciously intended to complement and extend, rather than repeat, earlier studies.

Year 7: Medieval Britain 1042-1485; Tudor Britain 1485-1603

Themes: royal authority, parliament, popular rights, centrality of faith, global context: colonisation
Links back: –
Links forward: Year 8 (royal authority), GCSE (Normans), GCSE (Power: Magna Carta, Peasants’ Revolt)

Year 8: Stuart Britain 1603-1714; Industrial Britain c.1700-1900; Imperial Britain c. 1700-1900
Themes: development of constitution, creation of UK, democracy, global context: trade, slavery, empire
Links back: Year 7 (royal authority, colonisation)
Links forward: Year 9 (empire), GCSE (Power: Civil War, Reformers, Chartists)

Year 9: World War I c.1900-18; Inter-war Years 1918-39; World War II 1939-45; Cold War 1945-91
Themes: systems of government, global context: war, empire, diplomacy
Links back: Year 7 (popular rights), Year 8 (empire)
Links forward: GCSE (Conflict in Asia: Cold War), GCSE (Power: Women’s Suffrage)

GCSE: USA 1920-73; Conflict in Asia 1950-75; Power & the People 1170-Present; Normans 1066-1100
USA 1920-73: chosen so as not to repeat prior learning on Germany or Russia (see Year 9) and instead to raise pupils’ geographical and political awareness of Britain’s key ally, the most powerful nation on Earth.
Conflict in Asia 1950-75: chosen so as not to repeat prior learning on World War I, the inter-wars years, World War II or the Cold War (see Year 9) and instead to raise pupils’ geographical and political awareness of an increasingly relevant part of the world.
Power & the People 1170-Present: chosen due to the valuable opportunity it provides to revisit, consolidate and embed the constitutional history that is such a focus of Key Stage 3 and so vital to the development of an informed and active citizenry.
Normans 1066-1100: chosen due to the valuable opportunity it provides to revisit, consolidate and embed the first topic studied in Year 7, thereby emphasising the scale of the learning journey that has occurred, and to link forward to the medieval religiosity and papal ambition of the A-level’s Age of the Crusades unit.

A-level: The Age of the Crusades 1071-1204; The Wars of the Roses 1450-99
The Age of the Crusades 1071-1204: chosen so as to provide students with a rare and yet increasingly relevant understanding of the most contentious interactions between the Christian West and Islam.
The Wars of the Roses 1450-99: chosen so as to provide students with a rare and fascinating glimpse into the end of the medieval era, the birth of Early Modern Britain and the emergence of our most famous dynasty.

Implementation

Ofsted EIF: “teachers present subject matter clearly, promoting appropriate discussion … (Over) the course of study, teaching is designed to help learners to remember in the long term the content they have been taught … (Teachers) use assessment well, for example to help learners embed and use knowledge fluently … The resources and materials … reflect the provider’s ambitious intentions for the course of study”

The Lakes School History Curriculum (Years 7-13) meets these criteria in a number of ways. Teaching staff employ a wide range of techniques and a broad spectrum of resources to deliver engaging and yet challenging learning experiences that facilitate rapid pupil progress. Lesson enquiries across all years are consciously structured so as to necessitate deep thinking and encourage extended written responses. Feedback, both verbal during lessons and written in exercise books, is focussed both on the commendation of achievement and practical guidance on improvement. In order both to lessen the burden of formal assessment on staff and improve pupils’ ability to absorb and recall an extended body of knowledge, assessments have been completely overhauled. They are now much briefer and yet more frequent and now include numerous short questions promoting and improving factual recall.

It is hoped by all members of staff in the History Department that this newly overhauled approach to all three Key Stages will result in the young people at The Lakes School being inspired to engage passionately with their historical studies, being challenged to raise their expectations of themselves and feeling empowered to contribute knowledgably and constructively to their community.

Impact

Ofsted EIF: “learners develop detailed knowledge and skills … and, as a result, achieve well. Where relevant, this is reflected in results … that meet government expectations … (Learners) are ready for the next stage of education, employment or training. Where relevant, they gain qualifications that allow them to go on to destinations that meet their interests, aspirations and the intention of their course of study.”

The Lakes School History Curriculum (Years 7-13) meets these criteria in a number of ways. At Key Stage 3, through both the content covered and the methodology used, pupils accrue the key knowledge and skills that will prepare them for progression onto GCSE study. Their progress is monitored through the frequent assessments detailed above. Due to the quality of provision, the great majority of pupils perform in line with their targets and yet, where underachievement is identified, it is tackled early with a range of intervention techniques. At Key Stage 4, pupils once more develop rapidly the necessary knowledge base and skills for examination through repeated knowledge tests and timed, written practice right from the start of the course. Again, progress is monitored through effective marking and data analysis and underachievement is tackled swiftly. As a result, the majority of pupils meet their targets. At Key Stage 5, as is to be expected, pupils take a greater degree of responsibility for their learning but are required to read substantial academic texts in their own time on a regular basis. Underachievement, on the rare occasion it occurs, is again tackled immediately. As a consequence, all History A-level students are successful in moving on to their desired next destination.

It is hoped by all members of staff in the History Department that the high expectations and quality of support across all three Key Stages will result in the young people at The Lakes School being inspired to aim as high as they can, being challenged to take greater responsibility for their learning and feeling empowered to progress onto the next stage in their learning or working lives with confidence.

Progress Ladder
  Historical Skills  Historical Concepts   
Communicating UnderstandingUsing SourcesCause & ConsequenceChange & ContinuitySignificanceInterpretations of the Past
Developing1: BasicIn general, written work discusses the past in basic detail and with a basic understanding. Judgements are absent.A basic description of what can be learnt from a source. Judgements are absent.1: BasicA basic description of the causes and consequences of historical events. Judgements are absent.A basic description of the nature, extent and pace of change and continuity over time. Judgements are absent.A basic description of the significance of a range of events, people or factors. Judgements are absent.A basic description of the reasons why an interpretation has been reached. Judgements are absent.
2: SimpleIn general, written work discusses the past in simple detail and with a simple understanding. Judgements are asserted.A simple description of what can be learnt from a source. Judgements are asserted.2: SimpleA simple description of the causes and consequences of historical events. Judgements are asserted.A simple description of the nature, extent and pace of change and continuity over time. Judgements are asserted.A simple description of the significance of a range of events, people or factors. Judgements are asserted.A simple description of the reasons why an interpretation has been reached. Judgements are asserted.
Securing3: SoundIn general, written work discusses the past in sound detail and with a sound understanding. Judgements are unbalanced and barely substantiated.A sound explanation of the extent to which a source is useful with reference to both its content and provenance. Judgements are unbalanced and barely substantiated.3: SoundA sound explanation of the importance of, and links between a range of causes and consequences of historical events. Judgements are unbalanced and barely substantiated.A sound explanation of the nature, extent and pace of change and continuity over time. Judgements are unbalanced and barely substantiated.A sound explanation of the significance of a range of events, people or factors. Judgements are unbalanced and barely substantiated.A sound explanation of the reasons why an interpretation has been reached and the degree to which it is convincing. Judgements are unbalanced and barely substantiated.
4: GoodIn general, written work discusses the past in good detail and with a good understanding. Judgements are slightly unbalanced and only partly substantiated.A good explanation of the extent to which a source is useful with reference to both its content and provenance. Judgements are slightly unbalanced and only partly substantiated.4: GoodA good explanation of the importance of, and links between a range of causes and consequences of historical events. Judgements are slightly unbalanced and only partly substantiated.A good explanation of the nature, extent and pace of change and continuity over time. Judgements are slightly unbalanced and only partly substantiated.A good explanation of the significance of a range of events, people or factors. Judgements are slightly unbalanced and only partly substantiated.A good explanation of the reasons why an interpretation has been reached and the degree to which it is convincing. Judgements are slightly unbalanced and only partly substantiated.
Mastering5: ExcellentIn general, written work discusses the past in excellent detail and with an excellent understanding. Judgements are balanced and substantiated.An excellent analysis of the relative utility of a range of sources based on an accurate evaluation of both their content and their provenance. Judgements are balanced and substantiated.5: ExcellentAn excellent analysis of the relative importance of, and links between, a range of causes and consequences of historical events. Judgements are balanced and substantiated.An excellent analysis of the nature, extent and pace of change and continuity over time. Judgements are balanced and substantiated. An excellent analysis of the relative significance of a range of events, people or factors. Judgements are balanced and substantiated.An excellent analysis of the reasons why an interpretation has been reached and the degree to which it is therefore convincing. Judgements are balanced and substantiated.
6: ComplexIn general, written work discusses the past in complex detail and with a complex understanding. Judgements are well balanced and fully substantiated.A complex analysis of the relative utility of a range of sources based on an accurate evaluation of both their content and their provenance. Judgements are well balanced and fully substantiated.6: ComplexA complex analysis of the relative importance of, and links between, a range of causes and consequences of historical events. Judgements are well balanced and fully substantiated.A complex analysis of the nature, extent and pace of change and continuity over time. Judgements are well balanced and fully substantiated.A complex analysis of the relative significance of a range of events, people or factors. Judgements are well balanced and fully substantiated.A complex analysis of the reasons why an interpretation has been reached and the degree to which it is therefore convincing. Judgements are well balanced and fully substantiated.
History Curriculum KS3
 Autumn 1Autumn 2Spring 1Spring 2Summer 1Summer 2
Year 7 TopicsHow did William take control of England?How significant a role did religion play in people’s lives?What was expected of medieval kings?What was everyday life like for ordinary people?How great were the religious changes during the early Tudor period?How successful was Elizabeth I’s reign?
Year 7 AssessmentThe Norman ConquestMedieval ReligionMedieval KingshipMedieval LifeTudor ReformationsElizabeth I
Year 8 TopicsWhy was this a time of revolution and radicalism?How and when was modern Britain born?How did Britain become the ‘Workshop of the World’?How great were the social and political reforms of the period?What were the key characteristics of the slave trade?What was Britain’s relationship with wider world at this time?
Year 8 AssessmentEnglish Civil WarThe Making of BritainIndustrial RevolutionThe Era of ReformThe Slave TradeThe British Empire
Year 9 TopicsWhy did World War I break out in 1914?What was the impact of World War I?How successful was the search for peace?Why did World War II break out in 1939?What was the impact of World War II?How did the Cold War divide the world?
Year 9 AssessmentCauses of World War IWorld War IPeace & the DictatorsCauses of World War IIWorld War IIThe Cold War
History Curriculum KS4
 Autumn 1Autumn 2Spring 1Spring 2Summer 1Summer 2
Year 10 TopicsPaper 1 Section A
The USA 1910-73
Paper 1 Section B
Conflict in Asia 1950-75
Paper 2 Section A
Power & the People
Paper 2 Section B
Norman England
Paper 1 Section A
The USA 1910-73
Paper 1 Section B
Conflict in Asia 1950-75
Year 10 AssessmentGCSE practiceGCSE practiceGCSE practiceGCSE practiceGCSE practiceGCSE practice
Year 11 TopicsPaper 2 Section A
Power & the People
Paper 2 Section B
Norman England
Paper 1 Section A
The USA 1910-73
Paper 1 Section B
Conflict in Asia 1950-75
Paper 2 Section A
Power & the People
Paper 2 Section B
Norman England
Year 11 AssessmentGCSE practiceGCSE practiceGCSE practiceGCSE practiceGCSE practiceGCSE practice
GCSE History

History is an extremely challenging subject. Over 90% of your time will be spent either reading or writing. You will be expected to read in-depth textbooks, write and maintain detailed, comprehensive notes and practise examination questions repeatedly. You will be expected to develop high-level skills of source evaluation and the ability to discuss the validity of historians’ interpretations of the past using your own historical knowledge. You will be expected, the other 10% of the time, to contribute constructively and incisively to class debates and discussions.

 And yet History is also fascinating. It can be inspiring or alarming, heartening or disturbing, a story of progress and civilisation or of catastrophe and inhumanity. Its importance goes well beyond the subject’s intrinsic interest and appeal, too. Our beliefs and actions, our cultures, institutions and ways of living, our values and our means of making sense of ourselves are all shaped by the past.

 If we want to understand ourselves fully today, and to understand our possible futures, we have no choice but to study the past.

PAPER 1 SECTION A (1 hour): America, 1920–1973

This period study focuses on the development of the USA during a turbulent half century of change. It was a period of opportunity and inequality – when some Americans lived the ‘American Dream’ whilst others grappled with the nightmare of poverty, discrimination and prejudice. Students will study the political, economic, social and cultural aspects of these two developments and the role ideas played in bringing about change. They will also look at the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change and the impact the developments had on them.

PAPER 1 SECTION B (1 hour): Conflict and Tension in Asia, 1950–1975

This wider world depth study enables students to understand the complex and diverse interests of different states and individuals and the ideologies they represented. It considers the role of nationalist movements in causing and sustaining conflict. It focuses on the causes and events of the Cold War in Asia and seeks to show how and why conflict occurred and why it proved difficult to resolve the tensions which arose. This study also considers the role of key individuals and groups in shaping change, as well as how they were affected by and influenced international relations.

PAPER 2 SECTION A (1 hour): Power and the People, c1170 to the Present Day

This thematic study will enable students to gain an understanding of the development of the relationship between the citizen and the state in Britain over a long period of time. It considers the causes, scale, nature and consequences of protest to that relationship. By charting the journey from feudalism and serfdom to democracy and equality, it reveals how, in different periods, the state responds to challenges to its authority and their impact. It allows students to construct an understanding of the rights and responsibilities of the citizen. Students will have the opportunity to see how ideas, events or developments in the wider world affected the course of Britain’s political development and will promote the idea that ideas of authority, challenge and rights did not develop in isolation, but these developments should be seen in terms of how they affected Britain and British people.

PAPER 2 SECTION B (1 hour): Norman England, c1066–c1100

This option allows students to study in depth the arrival of the Normans and the establishment of their rule. The depth study will focus on major aspects of Norman rule, considered from economic, religious, political, social and cultural standpoints of this period and arising contemporary and historical controversies.

A-Level History

“To stay ignorant of the past is to remain forever a child.”
Cicero, 106BC – 46BC

History is about people and people are complex, fascinating, frustrating and a whole lot of other things besides! This is why History is probably the most comprehensive and intriguing subject of all. It can be inspiring or alarming, heartening or disturbing, a story of progress and civilisation or of catastrophe and inhumanity. But History’s importance goes well beyond the subject’s intrinsic interest and appeal. Our beliefs and actions, our cultures, institutions and ways of living, our values and our means of making sense of ourselves are all shaped by the past.

If we want to understand ourselves fully today, and to understand our possible futures, we have no choice but to study the past.

What topics would I study?

A 2013 survey by Cambridge University found that 50% of the top ten most popular A-level History courses in the UK focussed on two people: Henry VIII and Hitler. That is why we don’t teach those courses here at The Lakes School. Instead, we seek to stimulate your sense of intrigue and discovery and develop your skills of enquiry and debate by pursuing two more unusual and highly respected topic areas.

 

UNIT 1: The Age of the Crusades, 1071-1204 (2h30m exam, 40%)

In this topic area, you would study the repeated attempts by Christian Europe to take back the Holy Land from Islamic hands. By investigating the causes and events and outcomes of the first four Crusades, and historians’ interpretations of them, you would gain an uncommonly impressive understanding of this seminal period in the history of Europe and the Middle East and a valuable perspective on global events today.

 

UNIT 2: The Wars of the Roses, 1450-99 (2h30m exam, 40%)

In this topic area, you would study in considerable depth the challenges faced by those in authority during one of the most convulsive periods of conflict our nation has ever undergone. By investigating their motivations, actions and impact through first-hand contemporary accounts, you would gain an incredible insight into the powerful social, political and religious forces at work in our country at the very moment we emerged painfully from the medieval period and into the early modern era.

 

UNIT 3: Historical Investigation (4000 word essay, 20%)

For your coursework, which you would research, plan and write up independently over the two year course, you would be free to choose from a varied list of questions. All relate to the Ancient and Medieval periods only. Topics range from Alexander the Great, the triumph of Athens, the fall of the Roman Republic and Roman Britain up to Alfred and the creation of England, the Vikings and King John.

What are the requirements?

 History is an extremely challenging subject so a willingness to work hard in lessons and then follow up your learning with extensive further reading in your own spare time is essential. An 8 in GCSE History is preferable but a 7 is the minimum grade that will be accepted. Alongside this, a 7 in GCSE English would be desirable.

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